“Is hearing loss affecting your freedom to live life to the fullest?”
 
Meet Fanie du Toit, from NCPD, and Francis Slabber

Fanie du Toit

Fanie du Toit

Fanie is an Adult Education Practitioner and for more than a decade, presenter of the programme, “Leefwêreld van die Gestremde” on RSG, as well as on many Community Radio Stations in SA. He is the senior specialist in hearing impairment & deaf affairs at the National Council of & for Persons with Disabilities.

Francis Slabber

Francis Slabber

Francis qualified her as a Speech & Language Therapist and Audiologist in 1992 at the University of Pretroia. Although dually qualified, she soon realized that audiology was where her heart and passion was. She relocated to Cape Town in 1999 when she started working at The Hearing Clinic which at that stage was owned and run by Janet Steer. Over the years the practice grew and she soon became a partner and now owns and runs it.

NCPD Casual Day

Communication Challenges & COVID-19

The most complaints that we at the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities have received over these past few weeks is the frustration of hearing impaired or deaf persons not being able to communicate, as the face masks make it impossible to read lips, it muffles the sound, and the distance that has to be observed makes it even more challenging.

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Access to Primary Health Care Facilities for Persons with Hearing Loss

Here are some guidelines and background information that can be kept in mind by hearing impaired or deaf persons, as well as health professionals at primary healthcare facilities, in times of screening, testing and possible hospitalization…

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For any information relating to the Coronavirus, please visit the SA Government’s COVID-19 Portal at https://sacoronavirus.co.za

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Click the NCPD logo to visit their website or here for their Facebook page

Fanie du Toit is at South African Hearing Institute.
Fanie du Toit

15 hours ago

"If speech on Morning Live (SABC) can be translated for more than 600,000 SA Sign Language users, why not also use Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART), which translates voice into text at real-time speeds, to provide access to more than 4 million persons with disabling hearing loss, who do not use Sign Language? One group may not be favored over another, this amounts to direct discrimination. All people with hearing loss must be able to access information on an equal basis."Fanie du Toitfanie.dt@mweb.co.zaMorning Live-SABC Hearing in South Africa Reconnect Audiology Network Audiology Private Practice Forum - APPF National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities Western Cape Network on Disability Western Cape Association for Persons with Disabilities Road To Independence SADA - South African Disability Alliance Disability Info South Africa Hear2day Hello@Hearing " We listen you Hear" HearUs - A South African Cochlear Implant AssociationIda Institute South Africa ChapterSouth African Cochlear Implant GroupICASA121 CaptionsSA Human Rights CommissionSocial Justice Foundation NPO 165 067Cochlear Implant Users-South AfricaJohannesburg Cochlear Implant Centre South African Cochlear ImplanteesEduplex Pre-, Primary and High School ... See MoreSee Less
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2 days ago

We cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if we leave the person on the doorstep of the "audiology clinic", and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own. Reports are often just a clinical description of the hearing "problem" and difficult to understand for anyone outside the medical world. A report should be formulated in a way so that if the person takes it home to their family, friends and employers can understand it. This Protocol is built on the belief that no single person has all the skills and knowledge to write a truly functional report. The key is therefore to involve the person with hearing loss, the health professional (audiologist), a technical expert; someone from the disability sector, and a representative of the employer in the process. They don’t all have to be sitting round a table, as long as every person has the chance to give input. A successful functional report doesn’t replace the clinical report – in fact, the latter should be the foundation for and included in the former. Invisible impairments (psychosocial, neurological, hearing and intellectual) often lead to persons with disabilities not having access to affirmative action, social security and assistance benefits, as they are not easily identifiable“These persons are therefore required to present additional proof of impairment” (WPRPD 2015; Para 6.5.1.2)I want the individual not to have to fight on his or her own. Research shows that many people with hearing loss are too afraid to speak to their employer about their condition and the changes they need. A successful functional report is a tool to enable the individual to start that conversation and educate them on their right to accommodations too.I want the individual not to be exposed, I want the individual not to have to fight for his or her rights on his or her own. The hearing care professional and all the other relevant stake holders can help so much to stimulate processes if they follow this Protocol. In this context, it’s virtually impossible for the person with hearing loss to make progress without a comprehensive and comprehensible functional report. You cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if you leave the person on the doorstep of the audiology clinic, and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own.Fanie du ToitSenior specialist: Hearing impairment and deaf affairs and disability rights awarenessNational Council of and for Persons with Disabilities faniedt@ncpd.org.zafanie.dt@mweb.co.z082 8207358 ( only text messages)We cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if we leave the person on the doorstep of the "audiology clinic", and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own. Reports are often just a clinical description of the hearing "problem" and difficult to understand for anyone outside the medical world. A report should be formulated in a way so that if the person takes it home to their family, friends and employers can understand it. This Protocol is built on the belief that no single person has all the skills and knowledge to write a truly functional report. The key is therefore to involve the person with hearing loss, the health professional (audiologist), a technical expert; someone from the disability sector, and a representative of the employer in the process. They don’t all have to be sitting round a table, as long as every person has the chance to give input. A successful functional report doesn’t replace the clinical report – in fact, the latter should be the foundation for and included in the former. Invisible impairments (psychosocial, neurological, hearing and intellectual) often lead to persons with disabilities not having access to affirmative action, social security and assistance benefits, as they are not easily identifiable“These persons are therefore required to present additional proof of impairment” (WPRPD 2015; Para 6.5.1.2)I want the individual not to have to fight on his or her own. Research shows that many people with hearing loss are too afraid to speak to their employer about their condition and the changes they need. A successful functional report is a tool to enable the individual to start that conversation and educate them on their right to accommodations too.I want the individual not to be exposed, I want the individual not to have to fight for his or her rights on his or her own. The hearing care professional and all the other relevant stake holders can help so much to stimulate processes if they follow this Protocol. In this context, it’s virtually impossible for the person with hearing loss to make progress without a comprehensive and comprehensible functional report. You cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if you leave the person on the doorstep of the audiology clinic, and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own.Fanie du ToitSenior specialist: Hearing impairment and deaf affairs and disability rights awarenessNational Council of and for Persons with Disabilities faniedt@ncpd.org.zafanie.dt@mweb.co.z082 8207358 ( only text messages)Ida Institute South Africa Chapter South African Hearing Institute (SAHI) Hearing in South AfricaAudiology Private Practice Forum - APPF Reconnect Audiology Network Hear2day HearUs - A South African Cochlear Implant Association Hello@Hearing " We listen you Hear" SADA - South African Disability Alliance Western Cape Network on Disability Western Cape Association for Persons with Disabilities Disability Info South Africa Road To Independence Fanie Dreams ... See MoreSee Less
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Fanie du Toit is at South African Hearing Institute.
Fanie du Toit

15 hours ago

"If speech on Morning Live (SABC) can be translated for more than 600,000 SA Sign Language users, why not also use Communication Access Real-time Translation (CART), which translates voice into text at real-time speeds, to provide access to more than 4 million persons with disabling hearing loss, who do not use Sign Language? One group may not be favored over another, this amounts to direct discrimination. All people with hearing loss must be able to access information on an equal basis."Fanie du Toitfanie.dt@mweb.co.zaMorning Live-SABC Hearing in South Africa Reconnect Audiology Network Audiology Private Practice Forum - APPF National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities Western Cape Network on Disability Western Cape Association for Persons with Disabilities Road To Independence SADA - South African Disability Alliance Disability Info South Africa Hear2day Hello@Hearing " We listen you Hear" HearUs - A South African Cochlear Implant AssociationIda Institute South Africa ChapterSouth African Cochlear Implant GroupICASA121 CaptionsSA Human Rights CommissionSocial Justice Foundation NPO 165 067Cochlear Implant Users-South AfricaJohannesburg Cochlear Implant Centre South African Cochlear ImplanteesEduplex Pre-, Primary and High School ... See MoreSee Less
View on Facebook

2 days ago

We cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if we leave the person on the doorstep of the "audiology clinic", and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own. Reports are often just a clinical description of the hearing "problem" and difficult to understand for anyone outside the medical world. A report should be formulated in a way so that if the person takes it home to their family, friends and employers can understand it. This Protocol is built on the belief that no single person has all the skills and knowledge to write a truly functional report. The key is therefore to involve the person with hearing loss, the health professional (audiologist), a technical expert; someone from the disability sector, and a representative of the employer in the process. They don’t all have to be sitting round a table, as long as every person has the chance to give input. A successful functional report doesn’t replace the clinical report – in fact, the latter should be the foundation for and included in the former. Invisible impairments (psychosocial, neurological, hearing and intellectual) often lead to persons with disabilities not having access to affirmative action, social security and assistance benefits, as they are not easily identifiable“These persons are therefore required to present additional proof of impairment” (WPRPD 2015; Para 6.5.1.2)I want the individual not to have to fight on his or her own. Research shows that many people with hearing loss are too afraid to speak to their employer about their condition and the changes they need. A successful functional report is a tool to enable the individual to start that conversation and educate them on their right to accommodations too.I want the individual not to be exposed, I want the individual not to have to fight for his or her rights on his or her own. The hearing care professional and all the other relevant stake holders can help so much to stimulate processes if they follow this Protocol. In this context, it’s virtually impossible for the person with hearing loss to make progress without a comprehensive and comprehensible functional report. You cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if you leave the person on the doorstep of the audiology clinic, and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own.Fanie du ToitSenior specialist: Hearing impairment and deaf affairs and disability rights awarenessNational Council of and for Persons with Disabilities faniedt@ncpd.org.zafanie.dt@mweb.co.z082 8207358 ( only text messages)We cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if we leave the person on the doorstep of the "audiology clinic", and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own. Reports are often just a clinical description of the hearing "problem" and difficult to understand for anyone outside the medical world. A report should be formulated in a way so that if the person takes it home to their family, friends and employers can understand it. This Protocol is built on the belief that no single person has all the skills and knowledge to write a truly functional report. The key is therefore to involve the person with hearing loss, the health professional (audiologist), a technical expert; someone from the disability sector, and a representative of the employer in the process. They don’t all have to be sitting round a table, as long as every person has the chance to give input. A successful functional report doesn’t replace the clinical report – in fact, the latter should be the foundation for and included in the former. Invisible impairments (psychosocial, neurological, hearing and intellectual) often lead to persons with disabilities not having access to affirmative action, social security and assistance benefits, as they are not easily identifiable“These persons are therefore required to present additional proof of impairment” (WPRPD 2015; Para 6.5.1.2)I want the individual not to have to fight on his or her own. Research shows that many people with hearing loss are too afraid to speak to their employer about their condition and the changes they need. A successful functional report is a tool to enable the individual to start that conversation and educate them on their right to accommodations too.I want the individual not to be exposed, I want the individual not to have to fight for his or her rights on his or her own. The hearing care professional and all the other relevant stake holders can help so much to stimulate processes if they follow this Protocol. In this context, it’s virtually impossible for the person with hearing loss to make progress without a comprehensive and comprehensible functional report. You cannot speak about person-centered care (PCC) if you leave the person on the doorstep of the audiology clinic, and then they must go out and fight for their rights on their own.Fanie du ToitSenior specialist: Hearing impairment and deaf affairs and disability rights awarenessNational Council of and for Persons with Disabilities faniedt@ncpd.org.zafanie.dt@mweb.co.z082 8207358 ( only text messages)Ida Institute South Africa Chapter South African Hearing Institute (SAHI) Hearing in South AfricaAudiology Private Practice Forum - APPF Reconnect Audiology Network Hear2day HearUs - A South African Cochlear Implant Association Hello@Hearing " We listen you Hear" SADA - South African Disability Alliance Western Cape Network on Disability Western Cape Association for Persons with Disabilities Disability Info South Africa Road To Independence Fanie Dreams ... See MoreSee Less
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